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Anything Dad Related => Dad Recipes => Topic started by: Chef Dad on April 13, 2008, 05:48:44 PM

Title: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on April 13, 2008, 05:48:44 PM
Figured I could field a few questions regarding my trade. Nothing is sacred here ( go ahead and ask how to shallow poach a halibut filet to impress the girls ) so feel free to ask questions about stuff you should allready know about ( bbq ).
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Bill on April 13, 2008, 06:30:25 PM
What is your preferred way to cook scallops?
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Keith on April 13, 2008, 08:32:01 PM
And...  If you cook with alcohol, does all the alcohol get cooked away?
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: BigLuv on April 14, 2008, 09:40:20 AM
Well i thought when cooking with alchy You do cook it out and typically left with just the taste.. but i swear rum cake can and will get you trashed
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Scott H. on April 14, 2008, 04:29:44 PM
how do you know what wines go with the meal? do you generally match the color of wine to the color of meat? (i.e. red wine with steak, white with pork, etc.)
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on April 18, 2008, 06:34:48 PM
Well first of all I love scallops, they're one of my favorite things to eat. I would recomend getting U-10s ( dry packed ) cleaning the small strip of conective tissue ( just pull it off ) then place the scallops in a line on a towel and pat them dry. Season with fresh cracked black pepper and a coarse kosher salt on both sides. In a nonstick sautouse ( sloped sided skillet ) over med-high heat add enough clairified butter or olive oil if you don't know how to clairify butter to coat the bottom of the pan and wait till you see ripples in the fat. If your temp is right and you don't over crowd the pan ( having to much in the pan will decrease the temp. of the pan and alter the results ) the scallops should only take about one and a half minutes on the first side and a minute and a half to two minutes on the second side resulting in a perfectly carmelized scallop showcasing the natural sweetness of this delicious little shellfish. If you can get them whole or on the half shell try firing up the old weber grill and throw some hickory woodchips that have been soaked in water for a couple hours right on the hot coals and smoke the scallops right on the grill for about five minutes covered with the vents open. If you buy alot and have leftover fresh scallops, puree the shi + out of them and with a little salt and pepper you can have a killer scallop mousse to top a beef tenderloin steak ( grill ). The smoke works well with the sweetness of a scallop so bacon ( cured and smoked ) is a scallops best buddy, take a half a strip of bacon and wrap from top to bottom not around the sides and prepair as listed above with fresh cracked black pepper ( omit the salt ) i would recomend a saffron vanilla buerre blanc with the bacon wraped scallops.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on April 18, 2008, 06:41:25 PM
Alcohol evaporates at a much lower tempurature than water does so when you apply heat ( cook ) with it you are left with all the taste and none of the alcohol. When applied to baked goods in a raw state like in rum cake, tiramisu or whipped into a creme' friache' or whipped cream the alcohol remains. When you add alcohol to a dish OFF the heat and return it to the flame you get a big cloud of fire because the alcohol evaporates as soon as you add it to somthing hot and the alcohol vapors are obviously flamable ( flambe' ).
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on April 18, 2008, 07:01:32 PM
The old rules of wines do not apply i.e red with red and white with white. First thing you need to do to pair wines with food is taste the wine and see what is comes out, leather, oak, burnt sugar, dried cherries, figs, grapefruit, black dirt, apples, pears...etc. then you need to establish the body of the wine ( think skim, 2% or whole milk ) after that is wether or not the wine is acidic or "tart" and finally is the wine sweet or dry? I could go further into the profiles and finish of a wine and wether the wine is old world or new but i dont want to go into too much detail. OK, this is actually more simple than it sounds, the flavors of the wine can either complement the dish or contrast the flavors of the dish for example a dry, slightly acidic oakey ( allmost smokey ) light bodied wine with tones of apple would go very well with the bacon wrapped scallops that i described in responds to bills post in that the lack of sugars in the wine contrast the sweetness of the scallop, the acidity of the wine would "stand up" to the bacon fat and the butter sc. ( acidic wines cleanse your palpate when eating fatty foods that "coat" your palate and mute flavors ) the oakeyness will complement the cured bacon as well as the apple tones and finally the body of the wine neads to be similar to the main component of the dish your making ( thats where the misconception of white with white and red with red come in ) keep in mind that there are light bodied reds and full bodied whites.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on May 01, 2008, 08:38:40 PM
This thread kinda died, hope I answered your questions. Anything else on your mind guys?
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: runthrubland on May 01, 2008, 08:49:05 PM
It's a great idea though. I tend to need help right now when a question arises for me but I will keep this in mind.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Scott H. on May 02, 2008, 12:35:12 PM
Yeah, that really did help. With the selection of wine that we just got as a gift, we're trying to pair it with the foods we're eatting. my next adventure is various marinades. Be on the look out!!
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: BobChase on May 02, 2008, 01:17:37 PM
Could you recommend a good non-stick sautée pan that will stand the test of time?

I've tried Calphalon and All-Clad, neither of which lasted very long. I got about 6 months out of the Calphalon and 18 for the All-Clad.

Great idea BTW :up:
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on May 02, 2008, 03:10:14 PM
CAST IRON. just remember not to scrub the finish off and keep water off it as best as you can, otherwise you'll get iron oxide ( rust ). Not only does cast iron provide very " lasting " qualities but it actually imparts nutrition and flavor. A properly cared for cast iron skillet will outlast you and you children. If you want to stick with a teflon coating just remember not to use any metal ( tongs, wisks ), wood or hard plastic ( spoons, spatulas or turners ) utensils in the pan and to clean with a cotton towel/ rag instead of a metal scruby, steel wool or even a coarse plastic scruby. It just takes one tiny scratch to start the domino affect in a non-stick pan.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Scott H. on May 02, 2008, 03:32:16 PM
I can swear by the cast iron pans lasting forever. My younger sis has one that my grandmother got from her mother as a wedding present, and it was already seasoned and used when she got it in the 1940's!
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: JgansoC on May 02, 2008, 03:32:30 PM
What is the proper way to sharpen a butcher knife?
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on May 03, 2008, 12:33:38 AM
Use a two or three sided wetstone ( lubricate with either water or mineral oil ) start with the blade at a 20 degree angle to the surface of the stone and the knife at a 45 degree angle to the stone. In one swipe starting at the heel of the knife and ending at the tip " slice " the stone in a slight arc. Start with the coarse side then the medium grit on to the fine grit passing over each grit only a couple times on each side as not to file off the "edge" by grinding down one side more than it's opposite. Having properly sharpend your knife you can keep your edge longer by honing your knife everytime you use it by using a steal to "comb" the microscopic feathers on the cutting edge of your blade.

P.S ~ by Bucher knife did you mean Scimatar?
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: PFof2 on May 03, 2008, 10:26:02 AM
Alright I have a question, I have seen on a few cooking shows about leaving meat out at room temperature for about 30 minutes to make it cook better. Is there any truth to that? I tried it with ground beef when making tacos and it seemed to cook better but I also just got a new pan.. and does that apply to all meats?
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on May 03, 2008, 01:17:06 PM
Well, this is kinda a touchy subject. To get right to the point, Yes resting your meat ( protien, most of which coagulates at 160 F)( Beef, Lamb or Pork ) before and after cooking will result in a juicier more consistant product because you "stress" the protien "mesh" less, think of meat as a very dense sponge. I'm a NRAEF certified Instructor and certified proctor and i could literaly talk for days about ServSafe and the FDA food code but I'll just say this, the temperature danger zone (41 F-135 F) is the temperature where pathogens ( illness causing microoganizms ) grow and is a place you don't want your food to be. The more time your food spends in the TDZ the bigger your chances of getting sick become. So frankly speaking you want to heat up ( cooking and reheating ) and cool your food as fast as possible, Then there's the whole issue with holding temperatures and minimum internal temperatures.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: runthrubland on May 04, 2008, 01:50:34 PM
Fully agree with the cast Iron, I love it. On that note, my bbq has cast Iron grills on it what is a good way to store the grills over the winter so I don't have to re-cure it every summer.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on May 04, 2008, 08:46:56 PM
Do you not have them covered!?
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: runthrubland on May 06, 2008, 12:23:03 AM
just the lid
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on May 06, 2008, 10:57:44 AM
Condensation is the killer here, at the end of the grilling season clean the grates really good then rub them down with alot of oil while cool and take them off the ledge that they sit on. If you leave them where water could sit ( the ledge ) chances are good that the water will have time to penetrate your barrier. And you can allways pack up your grates for the winter, just toss em' in a rubbermaid.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: pinmonkey001 on May 14, 2008, 09:25:33 AM
A few years ago while in North Carolina I attended a pig roast.  One of the things they made was pulled pork with a vinigar based bbq sauce.  What I'd like to do is duplicate this.  Maybe using a pork roast and a slow cooker.

my questions are.

1) where can I find a good vinigar based BBQ sauce recipie?
2) what is best hunk of pig to use do you think?
3) should I scrap the slow cooker and just try to smoke it?
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on May 14, 2008, 09:09:26 PM
SMOKE IT!! slow and low is the key here, give it three hours in the smoker and another hour and a half in an oven at 275F degrees. Best cut would be the Boston Butt ( the shoulder ) bone in. Rub it down with paprika, cumin, chili powder, garlic, onion, cayenne and black pepper. Serve it with hog wash, pickles and thinly sliced vidallia onions on dollar rolls or yeast rolls.

HOG WASH~                                                          HOG WASH version 2

Apple Cider Vinegar  1 C                                           1/2 c red wine vinegar
Honey                    2 Tablespoons                            1/4 c Worcestershire sc.
Liquid Smoke*         one drop                                    2/3 c water or tomato juice
Cumin                    2 teaspoons                               1/2 t. black pepper
Paprika                  1 tablespoon                               1/2 t. cayenne
Cayenne                1/2 teaspoon                              1 T brown sugar
Chili Powder            1 teaspoon                                 1 T sugar
Granulated Garlic     1 teaspoon                                 1 T paprika
Granulated Onion     1/2 teaspoon                              1 t. salt
Salt & Black Pepper  to taste                                     1 t. dry mustard

*optional

note: the guys on the south side of North Carolina like tomato in their Hog Wash and so do I, I tried to replicate the more common recipe here but if you like you can add a 1/2 cup of tomato juice to this same recipe.

For version 2 you have to boil all the ingredients except the vinegar and Worcestershire then mix together when cooled.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on November 27, 2008, 02:37:02 PM
Any disasters or questions about your meal preparation today? Lemmie know, there's always a way to fix it. Last minute dessert ideas. Want to spruce up something traditional?
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Keith on November 27, 2008, 04:25:29 PM
Why do I get so darned sleepy after I eat on Thanksgiving?
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Frobozz on November 27, 2008, 09:10:19 PM
Why do I get so darned sleepy after I eat on Thanksgiving?


tryptophan!   http://www.howstuffworks.com/question519.htm (http://www.howstuffworks.com/question519.htm)
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Keith on November 27, 2008, 09:40:25 PM
That kinda makes sense..  I really haven't had any heart palpitations today..   Think that might be the case?

And sorry to hijack your thread Chef!
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on December 03, 2008, 12:00:48 AM
It's from all the booze, duh.

















Frobozz was like the guy in my class that raises his hand reeeeeal high and waves it around! LOL, i thought everybody knew about tryptophan.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: pinmonkey001 on December 03, 2008, 08:15:55 AM
I have a very neglected cast iron skillet.  What is the best way bring it back to shape?
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on December 04, 2008, 12:27:18 AM
you have to re season it. start by doing what you should only do with severely rusted out cast iron, steal wool and soapy water; scrub with as much elbow grease as you got. preheat your oven as high as it will go, fill your pan with a coarse salt ( mortons kosher salt ) and place on your stove-top set on high flame [ hoods on ( exhaust fans ) ] "burn" your cast iron pan until it stops smoking. CAUTION!!! PAN AND SALT WILL BE EXTREMELY HOT!!! Wait for pan to cool and discard salt ( and a s#!+load of black burnt soot ) and make sure to clean out and remaining flecks of carbon. Now that your oven should be nice and hot, add clean salt and enough oil to form a dense paste to your now super cleaned cast iron pan. "Cook" until pan starts to smoke, let salt cool, remove oily salt and rub pan down with an oily paper towel. "Cook" rub, repeat. The more times you repeat this process the thicker the layer of seasoning you will have developed, you will also naturally develop this seasoning by using your cast iron on a day to day basis. NOTE~do not let water touch your cast iron! Simply wipe clean and heat before using!
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: dewman28 on October 09, 2009, 08:26:49 PM
how hard\easy is beef wellington to make and how is it done? also what side dishes goes best with the wellington
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on October 10, 2009, 09:43:54 AM
That's actually really easy to make, you'll need a beef tenderloin that's been center cut cleaned and trimmed, some puff pastry ( in the frozen section ) and a mushroom duxelle that you make with button mushrooms, shallots and butter. First start by chopping your mushrooms very small, in a large skillet melt a generous amount of butter and sweat your shallots, add the mushroom and cook on a low flame until the duxelle starts to become pasty. Season the tenderloin with salt and pepper and sear the meat on all sides, allow meat to cool, spread duxelle on a sheet of puff pastry leaving room on the edges to allow for a good seal, place tenderloin in the center of the puff pastry and fold the dough over the tenderloin. Place the wellington seam side down on a pizza pan/ cookie sheet, and bake at 325*F until crust is golden brown ( about 45 min to an hour ). For a nicer presentation use scraps of puff pastry to cut out leafs and egg wash the entire crust for a darker, more even browning and beautiful shine. While the welly is cooking saute' a handful of mushrooms ( whole ) until they get nice and brown for use as a garnish laid around your presentation. I like a port reduction with my beef wellington, you could also use a compound butter with garlic and fresh herbs... i think i posted here before about compound butter. As far as sides go, this time of year, think roasted vegetables ( pearl onions, asparagus.. ) for the starch don't feel you need to go with mashed potatoes ( although they would work here ) try roasting some quartered red potatoes or yukon golds tossed with olive oil, dried thyme, dried rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper. If you weren't planning on doing this "family style" follow the same procedure with 6-8oz cut fillet of beef tenderloin, sear, top with duxelle and wrap individually, the cooking time and temp will vary a lot.. cook at 355*F until brown 15-23 min.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: dewman28 on October 10, 2009, 04:59:25 PM
sweet thank you very much ill let you know how it turns out. wont b for a little while but ill tell you how it goes
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Resdawg2 on January 29, 2010, 08:46:51 AM
I need some ideas on what to do with some boneless, skinless chicken breasts I bought, other than pan fryng or grilling.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: BobChase on January 29, 2010, 09:34:42 AM
I need some ideas on what to do with some boneless, skinless chicken breasts I bought, other than pan fryng or grilling.

Chicken Sandwiches

Season breasts with salt and pepper then broil and slice.
Slices of Italian bread, brush with extra virgin olive oil and toast in oven.
Once toasted, on 1 slice of bread layer fresh basil leaves, smoked (or fresh) mozzarella, roasted red peppers, sliced chicken then top with 2nd slice.

You can pop it back into the oven if you like to melt the cheese.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: JacksDaddy on January 29, 2010, 11:06:35 AM
I posted an easy (at least I think it is) recipe for boneless/skinless chicken breasts in the SAHD section about easy meals.  If you are interested let me know.  PM me or something.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Bigred on January 29, 2010, 12:21:09 PM
I need some ideas on what to do with some boneless, skinless chicken breasts I bought, other than pan fryng or grilling.

You could cut them into small strips season heavily with ginger and garlic and fry in wok, once you see no pink on the outside toss in some Red Green and Orange bell peppers or Broccili for about 2 minutes, constantly stirring

Or

Cut into small strips and season with garlic, chilly pepper, salt and pepper, and papricka and maybe some cilantro and fry in a wok, after done spritz a small amount of lemon on them and wrap them in a flour tortilla was some pico de gallo sour cream and cheese (fajitas)

Or

Cut into small strips and coat with Vrigin Olive Oil and lots of itelian seasoning and fry in a wok until done, then let cool for about 5 miutes and put ontop of romaine lettuce with feta chees and a small amount of ceaser dressing or italian vinegret dressing.

Or

Lay the breast out, cover with plastic wrap and beat the crap out of it till is thin, from this point you can put many different items in and roll it up cover with bread crumbs or not, and put in the oven at 350 to 400 depending on what you put inside until the chicken is done.

Things to put inside -
Swiss cheese and Ham
Feta Cheese and Spinach
Pico de Gallo (or Rotel diced tomatoes and peppers with cilantro) and Pepperjack cheese
Seasoned Rice (Premade) and mozzeralla
Bacon Strips with ranch seasoning and cheese


Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on January 29, 2010, 02:14:51 PM
 :clap: :goodpost: I only want to add; look at what you have to serve with it and go from there, instead of planning ahead, see what you have to work with ( veggies and starches ) and decide what to do with the chicken from there. If you have more chicken breast than you need for one meal I would suggest that you toss them with some fresh herbs, garlic, salt, pepper and olive oil and simply bake them off and cool them down, you can use this chicken for sandwiches or chicken salad, an ingredient in a pasta, or as a way to bulk up a salad in to a meal.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: davebrubek on March 11, 2010, 12:45:42 PM
I need some dinner ideas that taste good and are healthy or at least not really bad for you. The catch is my wife doesn't really like health food and won't eat anything green. Also it would be great if they were easy to cook and prep as my wife and I don't have a lot of skill in the kitchen.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Acidophie on March 11, 2010, 01:03:59 PM
What is the best way to prepare a good Filet of Beef? And also, your recipe for those awesome green beans! Thanks!
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on March 16, 2010, 10:07:56 PM
anything marked with an * denotes a healthy recipe.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on March 16, 2010, 10:26:32 PM
lol, wassup chip! for a fillet of beef tenderloin i would suggest a simple preparation as to not "mess with the simplistic style of the beef tenderloin" Grill or saute' starting with a high heat for a cut no greater than two inches thick, rub your steaks with olive oil, fresh minced or chopped garlic, kosher salt or any coarse salt ( Muldon sea salt preferred ), and fresh cracked black pepper. I would recommend eating this cut medium rare and so if cooking at a high flame 4 minutes on the first side and 5-6 minutes on the second side if cooking in the exact same spot. For the green beans, blanch and shock! by boiling a large pot of water to cook your green beans for a period of NO LONGER THAN 30 SECONDS and "shocking" them in a bath of ice water to stop the cooking process you will end up with a partially cooked green bean ready for the quick cooking process of sauteing. With your blanched green beans tossed in garlic and just enough olive oil to coat the beans, get a large skillet hot and toss your green beans in for a quick cooking time of not more than a minute or two, keep your green beans moving and season with salt and pepper while in the skillet. NOTE, if you do not transfer your beans in to a different container immediately after cooking you will over cook your green beans and cause them to become mushy and gross!
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Acidophie on March 17, 2010, 10:49:39 AM
Thank you! My mouth is watering just reading this.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Quagmire on December 29, 2010, 09:46:41 PM
I made some Clam Chowdah (N.E. style) today.  I got a recipe from my inlaws, and it turned out fairly well.  Problem is, it was a HUGE amount of chowdah...required one giant 51oz. can o' clams to prepare.  So, now I have lots of leftovers.  I'm gonna enjoy this for lunch the next few days, but I don't know that I'll come anywhere close to finishing this prior to my next trip for work (Sunday morning), especially since my wife isn't big on seafood and likely won't have any more.

Several people have said that it doesn't freeze well due to the potatoes.  Do you have any suggestions for making this more freezeable?  I thought about mashing it up with a potato masher prior to freezing, but I'm afraid that it might not have the desired effect and/or damage the clam meat.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on December 30, 2010, 07:53:20 AM
the FDA recommends throwing foods that were prepared in house (unpasteurized) away after seven days, the milk/cream, clams and potatoes will all degrade badly if you freeze this. The best way to cut down on ice crystals when freezing food is to freeze it quickly and with as little exposure to air as possible. Try breaking whats left into several smaller portions in containers that don't afford any air when sealed. Or you could give canning/jarring a try.
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Quagmire on December 30, 2010, 12:22:15 PM
the FDA recommends throwing foods that were prepared in house (unpasteurized) away after seven days, the milk/cream, clams and potatoes will all degrade badly if you freeze this. The best way to cut down on ice crystals when freezing food is to freeze it quickly and with as little exposure to air as possible. Try breaking whats left into several smaller portions in containers that don't afford any air when sealed. Or you could give canning/jarring a try.

I'll try the small container method.  I have a pot for canning, as well as some unused jars and lids, but I'm afraid of bacterial contamination.  The last thing I need is botulism.  I've done a few things in the past, but they've been pretty acidic, and I've been somewhat less concerned.  Thanks!
Title: Re: Ask The Chef
Post by: Chef Dad on December 30, 2010, 06:26:13 PM
Botulinium comes about from compromised seals and grows over time, if you cook and seal correctly botulism shouldn't be a problem. Campbell's soup does it all the time.