Author Topic: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter  (Read 3276 times)

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Offline Aftrthought051

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Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« on: January 19, 2009, 01:45:49 PM »
http://i.gizmodo.com/5133447/how-to-add-wi+fi-to-your-xbox-360-smartly-and-cheaply

The Xbox 360 is the best console you can buy. Except it's inexplicably missing something the Wii and PS3 have: Wi-Fi. You could buy Microsoft's $90 dongle. Or you could follow our guide.

The Xbox 360's lack of Wi-Fi is a totally killer hardware flaw—if you're not right on top of your router, you've either gotta string miles of ethernet cable or buy that pricey ass dongle from Microsoft. Unless you check out one of the cheaper alternatives. Here's every major way to get your Xbox going on Wi-Fi, sorted by easiest to hardest (but most satisfying).


Donglage
Dongles are, by far, the easiest way to get your Xbox 360 on a wireless network. But they also tend to be the priciest.

• Microsoft's official wireless adapter is $87, which is absolute horseshit for a Wi-Fi antenna attached to a USB cable. But it looks the nicest and is super easy to use—just plug and play. Update: This weekend you can get one for $69.

• The next stop is a third-party wireless adapter, where you've got your pick from Linksys ($65), Belkin ($70) and hey, Linksys ($90, but it's 802.11n). Same deal, plug and play.

• Finally, your cheapest option is from...Microsoft. Turns out, a regular Xbox wireless adapter (which is a supercheap $50), works just fine, with a tiny bit of finagling: Don't put in its actual install CD. Just plug it in, and set your encryption. It might take two tries to get it to work, but it will. And, it won't eat up a USB port like the official Xbox 360 one. Spoiler alert: This is our pick for best option, based on its combo of cheapness and convenience, if you can find one.

Share Your Computer's Connection
Sharing your computer's connection is the cheapest option—it's actually the freest one. It'll work with a laptop or desktop, though a laptop is more truly wireless—the desktop bit is an option if your router's just a step too far out of the way. Basically, you're plugging your Xbox into the computer's ethernet port, and then having it use your computer's wireless connection to connect to the internet.

Windows
It's actually harder to reliably share the internet love on Windows with its cousin, the Xbox 360, than it is on a Mac: No method worked reliably for us across multiple Windows computers. But here's how it should work:

1. Share your computer's wireless connection. Microsoft actually details the process here, and it's pretty easy. From the Network and Sharing center, click on the manage network connections option on the left. From there, right click on the connect you wanna share (probably wireless, unless you're daisy-chaining 'cause your box just won't reach) and hit properties. Under the sharing tab, just check the box to allow that connection to be shared. Plug your Xbox into the ethernet port.

2. There are a few other ways to proceed at this point, and you're probably going to have try at least a couple of them to find one that'll work. You could bridge the two connections (dicey), or you could manually assign the ethernet port an IP address, detailed here (PDF). This Instructable relies on automagicalness to resolve the settings, and I have had that work in the past, though not when I was sorting through methods for this how to.

All in all, expect to do some Googling and troubleshooting if you go the Windows route.

Mac
You'd think this would be easy, 'cause I heard somewhere that Macs just work, and internet sharing on Macs typically ain't hard, but there is a tiny bit of jujitsu involved here. This method, from Joystiq, is the most reliable one I used.

1. On your Mac, pop open Terminal, and type "ifconfig en0" (number zero, no quotes). A whole bunch of crap will pop up. Find where it says "inet 192.xxx.x.xxx" (it should be 192, anyway). Write that junk down. It will probably be 192.168.2.1, like mine. Also find out your router's IP address, which is most likely 192.168.1.1 (Linksys) or 192.168.0.1 (D-Link uses this), depending on your manufacturer. If you have Apple's Airport gear, the router will be at 10.0.1.1.

2. Then plug your Xbox 360 into your Mac, open up Sharing in Preferences. Turn on internet sharing, and share your Airport's internet connection with ethernet.

3. On the Xbox, flip to your network settings (under system settings), and enter the IP address you got from the terminal freaky deaky earlier but + 1, like 192.168.2.2 to my original 192.168.2.1. Subnet should be 255.255.255.0, and then set your gateway as the ifconfig number, 192.168.2.1. Under DNS (back one screen, then down), put in your router's actual address for both. Test your Xbox Live connection. Your NAT might suck, but you can get on Xbox Live.

Hack Your Router
This method is the least straightforward, and requires a little bit of work on your part. Essentially, you're buying a second router (a cheap one, for about $40) and installing custom software on it that turns it into a giant wireless antenna that's hooked up to your Xbox 360.

There are tons of Linux custom firmwares for routers nowadays, with DD-WRT and Tomato being the most popular. Tomato is a bit more user friendly, but it works with far fewer routers than DD-WRT. DD-WRT works with dozens of different routers (click for the list).

Whichever firmware you go with, the method for putting on your router will vary from device to device, with Buffalo routers being a notorious pain in the ass. Tomato includes instructions with the firmware download—but here are some of the details, and Lifehacker's complete guide to installing and using Tomato.

DD-WRT is my preferred firmware. Here are the detailed install instructions, but with most Linksys routers, you can just drill into the router settings from the web address (192.168.1.1) and upload the DD-WRT firmware, directly, making it pretty easy. But some routers require different, exceptionally specific install methods. So check out the list before you run out to Best Buy or Circuit City.

My preferred router for this because of its tininess and cheapness (under $40), was the Buffalo G-125, which required you to flash it over TFTP backdoor the DD-WRT firmware onto it during a brief window of time, like Luke dropping those bombs into the Death Star's vent shaft. It's a pain in the ass, but everything else about the Buffalo routers make it worth it. Unfortunately, you can't buy it in the States until the next month or so, so your cheapest bet is is Linksys's $40ish WRT54G, which unfortunately, has different install methods depending on the revision. The DD-WRT wiki is very good, so you shouldn't run into problems following it.

Once you get either firmware installed, you're going to set your hacked router up as a wireless client.

1. You're going to need to go into the hacked router's settings. Set the hacked router to client mode.

2. These numbers are going to vary slightly based on your router, but you need to assign it an IP address—if your main router's IP address is 192.168.0.1, set your hacked router at 192.168.0.2 or 192.168.0.101 (a number that's in your main router's DHCP server range). Then make the gateway and DNS the same IP address as your main router.

3. When it reboots you're gonna have to re-login to whatever IP address your hacked router is. Do that, go back in, and give the hacked router the same SSID (name) as your main router (Linksys, gizrox, whatever you have it named). You can also configure wireless security at this point, though for me, it's always been kind of flaky, WEP in particular, so you might have to play around to see what works.

4. To test, try to get online using the hacked router as your internet connection, with all of your computer's IP settings left on automatic. If it works, plug the hacked router into your Xbox. If not, check out the DD-WRT wiki for more halpz.

4. On your Xbox, you can leave everything set to automatic—the hacked router does all the work.

The hacked router method might take the longest, but at least you won't have a useless dongle when the Xbox 720 comes out, you'll have a full-featured router, and it's cheaper than the official dongle. Plus you'll have a feeling of accomplishment that will carry over to gaming, so you should kill a lot more people in Call of Duty.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2009, 01:49:10 PM by Aftrthought051 »

0xfe

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2009, 09:31:51 PM »
I've used the DD-WRT bridged router method for my xbox & my 360.   It's actually pretty easy to do with newer linksys routers, and works great.

AIRWAVES

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2009, 10:26:17 PM »
I also use 4 Linksys wrt-54g routers i got on ebay for 23 dollars for wireless bridges with dd-wrt. I have no issuse and i can run up to 4 things from each router to my wireless hub.

Offline vegaskiller73

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2009, 09:31:17 AM »
I just hardwired my system and my son's. I didn't want to take a chance with losing a wireless connection. My router is about 50' on the other side of my house with 3-4 walls in the way. Cat5 was too easy to run.



DgiftedJJV

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2009, 02:34:20 PM »
I direct connect straight from the modem. I live in a 3 story apartment building and on nights when I want to be left alone I head down to the "man room" in the basement and I actually run my ethernet wire from my second story window all the way down to basement. Its kinda a pain, but I get my "dad" time. Do you think a wireless solution would work for that situation? I just don't want any connection issues and I figured with it being a WWII era basement with thick stone walls that I'd be SOL.

AIRWAVES

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2009, 02:56:26 PM »
You can go with a wireless router converted to a bridge and should work fine. If signal is weak you can add 9db gain antennas and should work real well. Since it doesn't seem to be far for you from xbox to modem. I have never had a issue with mine in a year or two. I run 4 at the same time in my house with 3 or 4 different systems on each.

DgiftedJJV

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2009, 08:26:16 AM »
Cool, thanks for the info, I'll have to start looking into doing that. Would make my life a lot easier.

+1 Karma

PaulMck

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2010, 10:05:09 AM »
I am getting my associates in networking systems. wireless is nice but has a lot of pain in the a#$ issues. I play xbox on my computer monitor. so i have a cable ran under the carpet(getting cable and fittings and making them yourself is very easy, there is no specific wire pattern you have to use as long as its the same on both sides) to the bedroom from the router to a switch were i have my computer my server(a computer with nothing but a power plug and an ethernet cable plugged into it with all my external hard drives.. it never turns off) and my xbox. you just cant beat a hardwire connection and running cable in a neat way isnt to hard. three story guy. get a drill and run the cable through the floor. pull up the carpet in the corner of the room and no one will ever know.

HuddledTerror

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2010, 10:11:57 AM »
I hacked my router and it worked for a little bit, but then I kept losing connection, so instead I just reset my router and ran a 50' cable to my Xbox.  Hid it the best way I could.

If you can afford to get the wireless dongle then by all means go for it.  I have just found that hard wiring it is so much easier.

dadof2b0ys

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2010, 10:21:17 AM »
I just set this up the other day. I had an old linksys wireless router that I wasn't using. So i figured what the heck. So far so good. Haven't played any multiplayer yet though. Just Netflix and using it as a Media Center extender. I haven't had any connection issues so far.

Offline Leukoi

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2010, 10:29:57 AM »
I just use the Xbox wireless adapter.  Works great, and I always have four green bars.  Since my PS3 and Wii are also wireless, I'd have to run a cable all the way across the house just for my Xbox.  Now, I can move any console anywhere in the house without having to mess with cables. 

a_chiu

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2010, 02:02:09 PM »
Myself, I use the "Belkin 200 Mbps Powerline AV Adapter" and it works great for me.
Basically, it lets you create a network for high-bandwidth, using your home's electrical wiring. 
I have my router downstairs and my console is upstairs. 
I have a netflix and I can still get HD video streaming. 

Here's the dealbreaker why I decided this device instead of the wireless adapter:  My wife bought me a Turtle Beach X4 that uses RF signal which will cause any of your wireless adapter to drop contantly (if you use the 2.4GHz setting)

AIRWAVES

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2010, 03:22:48 PM »
I just got the new xbox wireless N-adapter and it works great. I hooked it up to my new linksys 610N dual band router with ddwrt on it and it works great. Running it on the 5gz band and everything else in the 2.4g band. Works great. No lag with having dual band at the same time makes a big difference.

Offline PFof2

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Re: Set up Wi-Fi on 360 w/o buying $90 adapter
« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2010, 05:07:51 PM »
It took a few years but now the WiFi is built in to the new systems... should have been done all along. Way to get with the times MS!

 



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