Author Topic: Diabetes numbers expected to triple by 2050  (Read 3190 times)

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Offline Ramblin' Dad

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Re: Diabetes numbers expected to triple by 2050
« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2012, 02:22:57 PM »
Hmmm this is interesting, especially since I was diagnosed with type 2 a couple of weeks ago. Me being the geek that I am jumped on the internet to do some of my own research. Yes I know not all that you read on the internet is true, however I found a site full of diabetics with type 1, type 2, and pre diabetics that swear by the research and results of another author/site. I looked into it and an interesting article popped up that I wanted to share. No disrespect to jmac or anything, but it stung when said that it was basically the fault of fat people that they get Type 2. I beg to differ, in that genetics are a huge factor. Please read the article found here http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14046739.php

Here is a small excerpt from the article linked above.

Quote
Why Obesity Doesn't Cause Diabetes: The Genetic Basis of Diabetes

While people who have diabetes are often heavy, one out of five people diagnosed with diabetes are thin or normal weight. And though heavy people with diabetes are, indeed, likely to be insulin resistant, the majority of people who are overweight will never develop diabetes. In fact, they will not develop diabetes though they are likely to be just as insulin resistant as those who do--or even more so.

The message that diabetes researchers in academic laboratories are coming up with about what really causes diabetes is quite different from what you read in the media. What they are finding is that to get Type 2 Diabetes you need to have some combination of a variety of already-identified genetic flaws which produce the syndrome that we call Type 2 Diabetes. This means that unless you have inherited abnormal genes or had your genes damaged by exposure to pesticides, plastics and other environmental toxins known to cause genetic damage, you can eat until you drop and never develop diabetes.


The article also has a section in it that deals with the stereotype of diabetes being caused by obesity. How some old school doctors really don't do justice to treatment because they believe that the condition is self induced and that all the person has to do is drop pounds, so they just prescribe the medicine and admonish them for being overweight. True the weight does not help, but it has more to do with how the weight was gained than the weight itself. High carbs! They are in everything, just like I believe Pat posted:

A cheeseburger, large fries and a large coke from McDs will already set you back almost 200g carbs.  That's not to mention that one meal alone is about 1200 calories.

I know/knew people that would run to McDs everyday to eat and get this.  One of them is hitting about 450 lbs.  I'm shocked as hell that he doesn't have diabetes yet.  I'm certainly no saint though, in fact I was eating bad until a few months ago (nothing like that though) but I knew when enough was enough and luckily I started being much healthier before I got really bad (my peak was 280).


My guess is this person hitting about 450 lbs does not have it because he/she does not have the genes, or I should say damaged genes for it. Where as a person with the genes and the combination of the super carbs found in most fast food especially wouldn't have a chance.

In many instances it is not so much that the fat person gets diabetes, it is the person with the diabetic genes gets fat. In type two the way insulin is used is pretty F'd up initially. Type 2's or maybe even pre-diabetics basically become insulin resistant. It isn't absorbed right so more is produced and more is produced. Insulin is a hormone that takes the sugar in the blood and breaks it down and allows blood cells to absorb the sugar/fuel. If the insulin with the sugar is not absorbed it stores it in fat cells. Which is why people gain weight. If they aren't burning it, they're storing it. It's a viscous circle in that when your cells are not absorbing the energy they need, they starve, so you become tired and hungry. Being fat does not cause insulin resistance, insulin resistance causes fat. Especially if your diet consists of tons and tons of carbs.

This is also why metformin is prescribed. It does not create insulin or make your pancreas work harder. It makes insulin more absorbable, so that the sugars in the blood stream are actually used and not either being stored in fat or just hanging out coating blood cells and causing health problems. Many people that start using metformin, start losing weight too. Mind you also have to change your diet to a low carb one so that there is less sugar your weakened insulin system has to deal with. This change in diet also aids in losing weight.

One question I had was that if this was a genetic problem, then why was it rearing it's ugly head in such a big way, and why were there more fat people getting diabetes. The article above answers that to a certain extent for me. Are there environmental toxins that we are being exposed to that are causing genetic alterations? I bet there are. Think of all the pesticides and hormones found in our food these days.

Sorry this was long and drawn out. I just wanted to add my own observations and research to this thread.
 




Offline BobChase

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Re: Diabetes numbers expected to triple by 2050
« Reply #16 on: August 20, 2012, 03:45:33 PM »
One question I had was that if this was a genetic problem, then why was it rearing it's ugly head in such a big way, and why were there more fat people getting diabetes. The article above answers that to a certain extent for me. Are there environmental toxins that we are being exposed to that are causing genetic alterations? I bet there are. Think of all the pesticides and hormones found in our food these days.

I think you answered your own question John.

The food supply in this country (at least the part managed by industrial agriculture) is hardly food at all. Compare what passes for food nowadays with what your grandparents ate and I'm sure you'll find that they're at opposite ends of the spectrum. One thing today's "frankenfood" IS good at is making sure the pharmaceutical industry has a steady supply of customers.

Sadly these two industries along with energy (oil) dictate a lot of policy in this country.

So what can we do? Grow our own food, support local, sustainable agriculture and avoid food that comes in a box (doubly so if it has a cartoon character on it.)

Anyway, sorry to hear about your condition John. Try to eat clean and keep moving. Hopefully you can reverse it. I've read plenty of stories of people that have just by doing those 2 things. Good luck.


crissgill

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Re: Diabetes numbers expected to triple by 2050
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2013, 01:55:16 AM »
I heard this news from many places " Nearly 6 million don't know they have diabetes and 57 million Americans are pre-diabetic, meaning they are headed for the condition. In prediabetes, a person’s blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be officially diagnosed as diabetes".

 



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